All Posts Tagged: back-to-school anxiety

First Day Jitters and Back To School Anxiety

For many kids, the end of summer and the beginning of school is something to look forward to, but for some, it can trigger a case of school anxiety. Children may be unwilling to get on the bus for the first day of classes or might cry when they talk about starting school.

There can be many reasons for this separation anxiety and the resulting back to school fears: a move to a new house, an attachment figure’s illness, or a friend who has moved away. Kids may also worry over how they will do in school or if they will make new friends.

School Anxiety Causes

One of the most common triggers for back to school anxiety is starting school for the first time. First of all, any separation from a parent can be scary, especially if the child is used to being at home all day with them. In addition, school days are very organized – the child has to adhere to a schedule and do tasks and lessons at prescribed times, and these set routines can add stress.

For teens and older children who have been in school before, back to school anxiety is often directly related to their worries about how well they will do in the upcoming school year. They may be concerned about having to answer questions in class or might fear being asked to read aloud in front of their peers. In some cases, a child may have been made fun of at school or might have been the target of a bully the previous year, so they feel anxious about the possibility of this happening again in the new school year.

Even teens who are starting college may have some school anxiety, despite the fact they want you to think they are above something so “childish”. Leaving home for the first time, not having their parent around to fall back on, and having to adjust to a new world can all be nerve-wracking for a teen.

Back To School Anxiety Symptoms

If your child is apprehensive the start of classes, they will show pretty obvious symptoms. Back to school anxiety is likely present if they have:

  • Nausea or stomachaches
  • Trembling
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • A racing heartbeat
  • Need to use the bathroom more frequently

Some of the things you can do to help your child with school anxiety include:

  • Telling them you love them and that you will see them after school each day.
  • Role playing situations they may encounter so that they will be better able to deal with it if something happens.
  • Letting them know they are brave for going to school despite their fears. Tell them you are proud of them.
  • Reassuring the child that the first couple of days will be hard, but that things will be okay once they get settled in.
  • Visiting the new school with your child a few days before the start of classes, so they are somewhat acquainted with the building and their teacher.
  • Sticking to a familiar routine to make the child less anxious.
  • Talking about things that they can look forward to, both within and outside of school.

Coping With Parental Anxiety About A Child Starting School

We think of children as being the only ones who suffer from first day jitters, but many parents also have anxiety over the start of school. They’ve been their child’s protector, entertainer, and advocate all summer, so you would think these parents would be looking forward to getting a break.

Many parents actually dread seeing their kids head back to class, though, particularly those who have children starting kindergarten or whose teens are going off to college. Their worry over sending their “baby’ off to the unknown kicks in, leaving them with their own version of separation anxiety.

If this sounds like you, don’t feel alone. It is perfectly natural to be distressed over this milestone. Even so, here are some of the most common parental fears, along with ideas that can help reassure you that everything will be fine:

  • Fearing that the child will be scared. Sure, your child may be nervous, but seeing that you are worried can make them wonder if there is something to be afraid of. Instead, show your child that you are calm and excited for them to take this new step. Try to keep in mind that they will be so busy learning new things and making new friends that they will be distracted and less likely to be afraid once they get to school and begin their day.
  • Worrying that the child will get lost. After all, your kid is going off into to what seems like a huge building – how will they ever find their way around? Remember that schools deal with this all the time. They have teachers in place (especially during the first few days of school) to direct students to classrooms and to help them find the correct bus at the end of the day. For added reassurance, you can visit the school with your child a couple of days before classes start, when the teachers are getting their rooms ready. You both can meet their new teacher, plus you can tour the school to find their classroom, the bathroom, the lunch room, etc.
  • Fearing that the child will be bullied. Let’s face it, kids can be cruel, even starting at a young age. The best way to address your concerns to have a serious talk with your child. Let them know that it is not okay for someone to be mean. Try some role playing with your child so they can learn how to respond if another child isn’t nice to them. Teach them to walk away from the bully. Practice how they should tell a teacher or another adult about the situation.

If School Anxiety Symptoms Don’t Resolve

For most kids, the uncertainties surrounding the start of classes will fade away as they get used to the routine of a new school year. If these fears don’t go away within four weeks, however, or if your child has school anxiety that is inappropriate to their developmental level or age, they may really have school refusal.

School refusal is not an “actual” diagnosis, instead it is a result of the child or teen having a deeper issue, such as a separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, or a social phobia.

If you think your child has developed a school phobia, it’s important to seek treatment as soon as possible. The longer their school refusal continues, the harder it can be to treat.

We Can Help

To get help for your child’s school anxiety or school refusal, talk with a compassionate child psychologist at Children’s Center for Psychiatry, Psychology and Related Services in Delray Beach, Florida. Contact us or call us for more information at (561) 223-6568.

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7 Tips for Overcoming Back to School Anxiety

Another school year has come around and with it, the possibility of extreme fear and separation anxiety for some children. Although it’s normal for any kid to have a certain degree of back to school anxiety, there is a huge difference between a child who is nervous about the new school year and one whose anxiety is severe enough to seek professional care.

Kids often worry about things like fitting in or whether the teacher will pick on them, which increases their stress. In the week leading up to the beginning of the school year or in the last few days before the end of a school break, younger kids may show some separation anxiety by crying frequently, throwing temper tantrums, or being more clingy than usual. Older children’s school anxiety symptoms can include being moody or irritable, complaining of headaches or stomach aches, or withdrawing into themselves.  So how can a parent tell if their child just has school jitters or if they truly have back to school anxiety?

Fears about new teachers, harder school work, and being away from their parents are common for kids and usually stop within a couple of weeks once the child settles into the routine of the new school year. For those children whose anxiety symptoms continue beyond the first four or five weeks of school or seem extreme or inappropriate for their developmental level, a consultation with a therapist may be in order.

Tips to Ease School Fears

If your child is worried about the new school year, these back to school anxiety tips can help

  • Help you child identify what it is they are worrying about. Assure them that it’s normal to have fears. Give them your full attention and be sure to set a regular time and place to talk to them about their concerns. For example, bath time might be a good time to talk to a younger child, while a teen might be more receptive later in the evening.
  • Focus on the positives: In order to redirect your child’s attention from their worries, ask them to tell you a couple of things that are positive about school. Generally, even the most nervous child can think of something they like about it. Maybe they have a new friend or enjoy a certain subject or look forward to working on an art project. Looking for the positives can make the negatives seem a little less overwhelming.
  • Don’t pacify the child, instead coach them to come up with ways to solve their problem. Telling your child that “things will be okay” doesn’t help them get past their fears. What does is giving them some control. Encourage the child to give you some ideas of ways they can deal with what’s concerning them. This type of problem-solving helps them learn coping skills and teaches them critical thinking so they can develop a plan instead of simply reacting negatively.
  • Try role-playing. Going through a particular scenario can often help your child feel confident. Let the child be the “bad guy” teacher or scary bully, while you play the part of the child. Your responses can help them learn how to deal with the situation appropriately and allow them to respond with less fear.
  • Reinforce positive behaviors and reward their successes and their bravery in facing what they fear.
  • Be supportive, but don’t allow them to stay home from school. Even though it is normal for your child to worry about going to school, it is crucial that they attend. Allowing them to avoid school only increases and reinforces their fears. The longer they stay out of school the harder it can be for them to go back.
  • Seek professional help for back to school anxiety that gets worse or lasts more than about four weeks. Additionally, medication is sometimes appropriate in severe cases of separation anxiety.

Help Your Child Overcome Back to School Anxiety

If your child is struggling with back to school anxiety, it may be time to seek help from a compassionate child psychologist at Children’s Center for Psychiatry, Psychology and Related Services in Delray Beach, Florida. Contact us or call us for more information at (561) 223-6568.

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School Phobia and First-Day Jitters

It’s hard to believe it but it’s that time again: schools are welcoming back students all across the country. The summer weeks have passed and parents everywhere are stocking up on school supplies while their children pick out their favorite lunch boxes.

For many kids, the start of school is exciting. They get to see the friends they’ve missed all summer and there’s a sense of being that much closer to being “all grown up” or becoming an adult. However, some children have a school phobia that can give them the first-day jitters. These children will likely experience increased anxiety with the beginning of school.

School phobia is a complex and extreme form of anxiety. It is also known as school depression or school refusal and can occur for many reasons, including:

  • Starting school for the first time
  • Changing schools and having to make new friends
  • Returning to school after being away for a long time due to illness or an extended holiday
  • Fear of being targeted by a bully
  • Bereavement (of a person or pet)
  • Feeling threatened by the arrival of a new baby
  • Having had a traumatic experience, such as abuse
  • Problems at home, such as a family member being ill
  • Parents’ divorce or separation
  • Violence at home
  • Not having good friends or not having any friends at all
  • Being unpopular
  • Feeling like a physical failure in school sports
  • Feeling like an academic failure

One of the most common triggers of school phobia (first-day jitters) is starting school for the first time. The child experiences separation anxiety because they find it difficult to comprehend being away from their parents for an extended period of time. In addition, if the child is not used to having an entire day organized for them, the schedule at school can add to the stress they feel.

For older children who have been in school for a while, most back-to-school anxiety is directly related to their fears about how they will perform in school. They wonder if they will do well in games, be asked to answer questions, or be asked to read aloud. In addition, some children have been targeted by bullies or have been made fun of in past school years, so they feel anxious about possibly repeating this abuse in the new school year.

When school depression and anxiety starts to creeps into your child’s mind, the symptoms will be fairly obvious. The child will usually suffer from the following school anxiety symptoms:

  • Stomachaches
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Shaking
  • A racing heart
  • Needing frequent trips to the toilet

You can do some things at home to help with school anxiety in your children, including:

  • Reassuring your child that everything will be fine once they get past the thing they fear.
  • Telling them you love them and letting them know they are brave for going to school despite their fears.
  • Telling them you’re proud of them.
  • Keeping them to a familiar routine to make them less anxious.
  • Finding things, both within and outside of school, that they can look forward to.

If you suspect that your child is developing a school phobia, it’s important to seek treatment as soon as possible: the longer the anxiety continues the harder it can be to treat.

For more help with anxiety treatment for school phobia or the first-day jitters in the Boca Raton area, please contact Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-223-6568 today.

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